Memorial Day, once again

I don't know that I could say anything more sincere than what I said here last Memorial Day. Describing it as a "favorite" holiday is the only thing I sort of wince at when rereading it. As holidays go, its meaning strikes me as important as any. But "favorite" would be a more apt description if I thought of it the way many I know do--as the official start of summer. For the record, I have no problem at all with those who think of Memorial Day that way, for I believe most of us still reflect on this day at some point about those who paid the ultimate price in protecting us, those in the military now, and those who protected us years ago. The posts from my friends on Facebook and Twitter support this, as did the large crowd at my small town's Memorial Day parade and ceremony. To echo what I've seen posted and heard throughout the day--Thank you to all those in the military now and those who served in the past.

As I noted last year, my family tree is filled with those who fought in the Revolution, in the Civil War, and in WW II. It is on this day that I think of them more than on any other. Last year, I described my father's cousin, who was killed on January 8, 1945 at the Battle of the Bulge. This year, I considered writing about one of several of my Revolutionary War forebears, but that strikes me as more appropriate for an ancestry post when that urge strikes me.

One does not need to have an ancestor in the wars of our nation's past to be respectful of this holiday. Nor does one need to be in the military, or have a family member in there now, to have a measure of appreciation for this day. Further, this holiday does not demand that you sit around and meditate all day, and it certainly doesn't mean that you shouldn't enjoy that day off off from work, that beach day, BBQ, beer, pool opening, or whatever. It just should hit you at some point that you were given much by the sacrifices of others.

Happy Memorial Day!

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